Tag Archives: sci-fi

Wonder Woman’s God Complex

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Recently, I went to go and see the new Wonder Woman film in one of the better cinemas I’ve visited in Beijing. In comparison to most the other superhero films I’ve seen in the last few years Wonder Woman is pretty darn good, but I couldn’t help but feel as though there was a particularly large issue with the themes of the film and the fact that Hollywood doesn’t seem capable of dealing with those themes.

Full spoilers below…

Diana is the only child on a magic island hidden from the rest of the world and populated by Amazonian women. When wondering where such a child came from we’re told that her mother Hypolita wished for her so much that she moulded her from clay and asked the god Zues to give her life. This is something that Diana never questions despite the fact that she does admit the knowledge that men are ‘essential for procreation’.

We also learn that for some reason the God of War, Ares, chose to defy the rest of the gods, fighting and killing them. To combat Ares, Zues bestowed upon the Amazons the ‘God Killer’ which they used to vanquish (but not kill) Ares. The God Killer, Hypolita tells her daughter, is a grand sword which Diana, as a child, looks at with an almost forlorn gaze and asks her mother who would ever be able to wield such a weapon. Her disappointment when Hypolita tells her that it wont be her is palpable and the scene ends in such a way that I was left wondering whether or not it was the film-maker’s intentions that the young Diana display an almost psychopathic urge to kill a god one day.

As the film progresses we watch Diana grow up, conditioned by her mother’s obvious lies and her warrior aunt’s tutelage, becoming stronger, more badass but certainly not any wiser. Although Diana is brought up to be naive and unaware the audience hasn’t been, and anyone with a healthy upbringing on superhero movies will have already guessed that Diana is likely to be the daughter of Zues and that the God Killer is in fact her and not the sword at all. To the film’s credit these two revelations are never really treated as any great twist and so their obviousness doesn’t really hurt the story. They do however set the tone for what is to come during the rest of the run time and these two plot points feed into what seems to be the film’s main themes:

Firstly that Diana is a God. Invincible and supreme in her abilities. Secondly, she’s naive. Unaware of the nature of man and the nature of violence. It’s when addressing these ideas that Wonder Woman shows the most potential but also uncovers some of the downsides of the superhero genre as a whole.

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There’s a good action scene about halfway through the film where Diana has had enough of watching the horrors of WWI unfold around her and decides to take matters into her own hands. Despite the German machine guns pointing at her she runs across no-man’s land to liberate a small French village. It’s in this scene we have the first full reveal of her iconic uniform, we hear the pulse pounding drums that have become her theme for these DC movies and we witness the extent of her badassery as she flips armoured vehicles with her bare hands, kicks people through walls and literally punches the catholic church so hard it collapses. It’s all good stuff but it’s also where my skepticism of the film’s intentions began. It’s very handy having a bullet-proof supergod on your side, I thought, as her actions inspired her companions to join the fight.

Their victory over the village is short lived however and the Germans soon drop a chemical weapon on it, killing everyone. Diana runs into the orange cloud, not even wrinkling her nose against the gas, to see first hand the nature of man’s hate. It’s the first time that we see Diana completely as ‘other’ to us. Where any man, woman or child faces certain death in the cloud, Diana isn’t affected in the least. The film states, in no uncertain terms, that Diana is not human and she is not in any danger from us or our weapons. She is, however, applaud by our actions.

Instead of readdressing her preconceived notions about men and war though, she carries on with greater resolve to end the war in her own way. Diana, brought up on stories of gods, thinks that the only way to end the war is to defeat Ares, the god of war, who she assumes is causing the fighting in the first place. For some reason she has decided that Ares is actually personified by Ludendorf, the German general who along with the fabulously named ‘Doctor Poison’ is manufacturing the terrible chemical weapons that mark the film’s biggest threat. She confronts Ludendorf who, for no other reason than ‘it’s a movie’ has some kind of magic drug that gives him super strength. Still, Diana kicks him through a wall (watching Wonder Woman kick people through walls never gets old) and impales him to the floor with her God Killer sword. Ares is dead, she thinks, and yet the war continues.

wonderwomantrailer213-470x310@2xAgain we wonder if she’ll finally have to confront her misguided views of the war, but no. Right on cue, the real Ares turns up; a Brit nonetheless. He reveals the minor twists that everyone already knew and sums up the films ideology very clearly. War is a man-made invention. Although he admits to whispering inspirations to the likes of Doctor Poison he tells us that men are the real threat to the world and that no interference from gods can change that. He’s echoing something Chris Pine said earlier when he admits ‘maybe it’s us’; maybe man is to blame for all the horror.

This is the moment the whole film has led up to, where Wonder Woman has seen first hand that war is not a fantasy or a fiction, men’s minds are not twisted by any supernatural being and that war can not be ended by just fly kicking one man in the face. It’s also the moment the film betrays itself.

Wonder Woman decides to kick the crap out of Ares anyway, it is her nature as a weapon, after all. While she’s fighting him her comrades are fighting against the German chemical weapon and loosing. In a moment of weakness she watches Chris Pine commit suicide, taking the weapon with him and this gives her the strength to fight back again. There’s lots of fire, punching each other through buildings, lighting shot from fingertips; it’s everything we’ve come to expect from a DC movie’s final act, and just as empty.

The problem is that we’ve already learnt that Ares has no hold over this war. Killing him will not save the world and yet Wonder Woman fights anyway, ignoring the suffering of her comrades and with such drive that brings back the image of a child coveting a sword she prays to one day use. It’s her singular vision that means Chris Pine has no help from her when he flies off to his death, a gesture that could have easily been prevented by the supergod. It’s all something that could have meaning if it wasn’t for the film’s climax.

Wonder Woman harnesses her power as a god-made weapon, kills Ares and the war ends.

The take away from this final conflict is that actually Wonder Woman was right all along. Killing one supreme bad guy did end the war which must also mean that the war was the fault of this one god and not man at all. None of the men’s struggles or sacrifices mean anything in the face of this revelation and we are all absolved of any responsibility we might have otherwise had to have claimed for the cruelties of war. The film has betrayed its own convictions and through doing so has undermined itself.

Right from the first line of dialogue Diana is being lied to. Her world view is twisted and distorted to the extent that when she enters our world she can’t distinguish reality from fiction. Likewise however, her presence and her actions show her comrades that there is more to the world than they knew. In the end it’s Diana’s world view that wins out. A world of gods and monsters and where the evil of man is actually the fault of someone else. If this was actually the intention of the film then I would argue that WWI was perhaps not the right backdrop for the story. War, chemical weapons, hate and violence are, without a doubt, not god-created issues. They are caused by man, inflicted upon man and no amount of supergod stories can change this sad fact. By sticking to her original intent Diana shows no growth as a character. She’s as confused and misguided as she was as a child and still views the world in black and white terms, what’s worse is that the film makers seem to share this world view.

As much as I love superhero films I can’t help but think they are loosing their relevance in our society. The story of one man or woman saving humanity by punching a single baddie in the face is an outdated concept. It’s an issue that Wonder Woman almost addresses but gives into at the end, more than likely just because this is an American film and needs to end in a predetermined way. It’s a shame that the trapping of the genre force Wonder Woman to betray and undermine itself in the last moments because there is a more interesting story than Diana vs Ares fighting to be told. I can’t help but wonder what it would have been like if in those last moments Diana decided to cease her meaningless battle with Ares and go instead to help her new found friends in their struggle against their own kind. What if it was shown that Ares actually didn’t have much power over man and wasn’t causing the war? What if, because of this revelation, Diana showed us that the true power of a god is to inspire mankind to better itself rather than give into its basest instincts?

At the end of the film Diana, in the present day US, sums up her journey for us by saying that ‘only love can save the world’. However this is not what we’ve seen just moments before. Diana did not save the day by putting aside her outdated and ill-informed ideology and helping the war resolve in a peaceful way, she won through violence, just as the men of the film sought to do and in so doing proved that she really is, much like the German’s terrible gas, nothing more than the weapon she was designed to be. Unfortunately the film never addresses this parallel itself.

There’s a moment towards the end of Diana’s fight with Ares where the camera focuses on her, silhouetted in the air behind a red and gold sky. Her arms are outstretched and one leg slightly raised. It’s an image of Christ on the cross. Except here, Diana does not die to save mankind, she kills to save mankind. If love is the only thing that can save the world then perhaps superhero films need to find a gesture other than violence to bring their final acts to a close.

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Sci-Fi and why it’s so frakking important to me!

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ScienceFictionStories1There was a time my friends considered me to be, what many might call, a ‘geek’ and at that time, this may have been true. Now however, people might still call me a geek, but I don’t think I am deserving of the label. This is mostly because not having owned the sci-fi channel and then giving up most of my ‘me time’ whilst studying for 3 years, I just haven’t had the time to be one.

Having finished drama school though, I have found myself with much more free time than I recall having before. So, where I ought to be dedicating this time to creating more work for myself, I have decided to catch up on some long lost geekology.

To do this I’ve done 2 things; I’ve played through all three of my favorite computer games ever: The Mass Effect Trilogy, and I have started watching a show I’m almost 9 years (!) too late to: The re-imagined Battlestar Galactica. In doing these two things I have suddenly reopened my eyes and remembered why it is I love Sci-fi so much!

Partially, it’s because I love anything with Star Ships, Robots, Aliens and Space Babes. But partially, it’s something a bit deeper than that. I think it’s mostly because Sci-fi, for me (and it is subjective of course) more effectively than any other genre, allows a mirror to be held up, in which our own society and psychology can be abstracted and then explored.

My journey into science fiction started a long time ago in a galaxy far, far away when my parents introduced me to Star Wars Episode IV. Obviously, it blew me away. I don’t think at the time I had ever seen anything like it, and I wanted more. My parents, being huge Sci-fi fans too, took it upon themselves to introduce me to the likes of Star Trek and Buck Rogers. I had a brief but short lived foray into the original Battlestar Galactica too, but for some reason never watched much of it.

I loved these shows, and they felt so important to me, but I couldn’t quite place why it was. I dreamed of living in a world full of intergalactic vessels and peace loving aliens. In the meantime, I also started watching shows that were a bit closer to my age, such as the Batman animated show and reruns of Thunderbirds and Captain Scarlet.batman_beyond_by_ekaleva-d5cqpfp

One show which was very important to me, was Batman Beyond. The show picked up 40 years after The Batman had retired and Gotham City, although all spruced up and satisfactorily futuristic, had gone to hell. I remember thinking that the show was quite violent at the time, and didn’t shy away from depicting scandalous things such as nightclubs and hinting at sex. I felt very mature to be watching it. One episode that struck a chord in me was about a returning villain; Bane. In this episode I think he’d been selling Venom (the drug he uses to enhance his strength) to the kids of Gotham, who were now feeling the effects of addiction. At the end there was a shocking reveal of Bane, old and haggard, hooked up to a machine supplying him with the drugs he now relied on. I think at the time the episode upset me, and also paralleled a lot of the things I was being taught in school. Yes, I was just at that age for the whole ‘say no to drugs’ thing. As I said, the show also hit upon other sensitive subjects that were relevant to me at the time; Sex, violence, heavy metal…That sort of thing. Batman Beyond had such a profound effect on me that I still rate it as one of my favorite ever shows, and place on my list of most important shows to me.shadows1

At that time, there were whispers of another sci-fi show that my parents were watching. Something darker and moodier. Something my parents didn’t quite agree on if I recall correctly. The show was called Babylon 5, and it looked frakking awesome boasting computer generated effects, nothing like the miniatures and such of other shows. It looked so awesome in fact that I made my parents let me watch an episode one night despite their misgivings. That night, I went to bed before the final credits rolled and had nightmares about men with strange hair speaking to the decapitated heads of their enemies. I wasn’t ready for that yet…

A bit of time passed and mobile phones came into proper fashion, to an extent where most people had them. I looked at my friends mobiles and thought they looked quite similar to the communicators I’d seen in Star Trek all those years ago. New Sci-fi shows started coming to my attention such as Space Precinct, Farscape and Stargate SG-1.

And so came the time that I decided to face Babylon 5 again. I watched the lot, from the very first episode to the very last (although I must admit my relationship with season 5 was not that clear cut), and as Batman Beyond did whilst I was a kid, Babylon 5 effected me profoundly as I began to enter adulthood. Here was a show which dealt with questions of war, religion, politics, discrimination and so on and so forth. It was Babylon 5 which made me realise that Sci-fi is so much more than the whole good vs bad, Jedi vs Sith thing. That it was a genre in which complex and real concerns could be addressed in a mature yet abstracted way. It taught me that these shows could and often do parallel our own world, taking real politics and worries and dressing them in different clothes. This allows us to see them for what they are and to reevaluate our ideas about whatever it is. It was only after Babylon 5 that I began to recognise this in other shows also.babylon_5_wallpaper_1280x1024_5

Another reason Sci-fi is so important to me, is because it can do one thing more than holding up a mirror to our world, it can add to it, change it and warp it. Sci-fi doesn’t simply aim to hold up a mirror and say ‘look at what we have become, let’s all be miserable about it’, but it can also present us with solutions.

One example, could be the application of ideas such as sexism and racism. Think back to Star Trek, in which the crew of the USS Enterprise is completely multicultural. Crew members are both male and female, from various ethnic backgrounds and of course, human and non-human. This was a big thing at the time, and the role of Nichelle Nichols lieutenant Uhura (interestingly the name Uhura comes from the Swahili word uhuru: Freedom) as a leading character in the show was both controversial and forward thinking. Later, Star Trek become the show in the US to televise an onscreen interracial kiss, between Uhura and Kirk. This is very big. It’s very very big in fact, and it’s very important. This showed that Star Trek was not just a fictional vision of a Utopian future, but that the show itself was working towards creating that future.P98_1_Uhura_and_Kirk_kiss

Other franchises like Mass Effect for example also confront these issues. A large proportion of the Mass Effect story revolves around racism between alien species, and again, it attempts to not only present us with this vision, but also to present a solution. In the end, the races in Mass Effect are allied against a common foe, but it’s not just as simple as that. Atrocities of the past are taken responsibility for and if possible rectified. Age old race hate is put aside and denied. In Mass Effect, the common foe is just a catalyst, but it is the people themselves who reevaluate their relationships and work together to make up for the past. Hopefully, we don’t necessarily have to wait until a race of ultra-intelligent-robot-space-insects attack us before we start reforging alliances and irradiating racism from our world, but the message is still the same.

Another thing I really like in Mass Effect is the treatment of sexuality. There’s quite a lot of sex in these games, and it sure as hell doesn’t discriminate. Women have sex with each other, men have sex with each other, men and women have sex, aliens have sex, different aliens have sex, alien women have sex, alien men have sex…even the robots have sex, and not only with each other of course! It really presents us with an omni-sexual world and does so relatively maturely, if not with a little more enthusiasm than is entirely necessary.mass_effect_trilogy_-_n7_day

Something I found really interesting is that homosexual relationships between the main male character were not actually available until the fans of the series noticed this was missing. When they spoke up, the problem was fixed, and in Mass Effect 3 man on man romance options are available. So here’s a case of the people demanding a more rounded experience and the game developers listening. This actually made me very proud of the medium. I think this should also be given a fair amount of notice given that computer games are still relativity young. I find that most homosexual characters in games aren’t really taken very seriously, and are very rarely the main characters of a game. I think most of the games which are on the right track are actually made by Bioware, who are responsible for Mass Effect. There may be others, so I’m not too sure, but either way, it is a strong decision for the gaming equivalent of a Hollywood Blockbuster and one of the biggest games of 2012.

battlestar-galactica-wI have recently began watching the re-imagined Battlestar Galactica which features a very strong religious element and looks to bring up some pretty interesting questions about religious extremism and racial feuds, but I’m not too far in, so don’t want to comment on it just yet.

All in all, this is why I find science fiction to be so important to me. From Star Trek to Firefly, from Babylon 5 to Battlestar Galactica. To me, Sci-fi is a place where we can discuss and explore ideas concerning politics, religion, racism, sexism, war, technological innovation and so, so much more. But most importantly, it’s where we can present solutions to these problems and move forward, taking steps to create a better world.

So say we all.